Cities – Rented Sector Waste Management

Cities – Rented Sector Waste Management

A new ‘Guide to Improving Waste Management in the Domestic Rented Sector’ was released last Friday. CIWM Journal Online says the guide was commissioned “after research suggested that issues including excess waste, difficulty in containing waste, and high levels of recycling contamination from the rented sector contributed to poor street scene and represented a barrier to London reinvigorating recycling.“ With so many ‘actors’ sharing responsibility for household recycling and waste habits and performance (particularly in apartment blocks and HMOs), it’s a hugely complex topic. As Eunomia who developed the report put it, there is “no single ‘silver bullet’ intervention”. Instead they identify two broad areas of intervention – educate and encourage and enact and enforce – offering recommendations which include: incorporating waste management into landlord licensing processes using tenancy agreements to communicate responsibilities to tenants making targeted communications for landlords and tenants on responsibilities and how to use the waste services available These are sound ideas that may well help tackle the unique challenges London and all cities face. That said, there is simply no getting away from the fact that without the provision of adequate, accessible, all-user-friendly containers and waste systems, the issues of excess, containment/’leakage’ and contamination will persist. And as city populations continue to grow, so too will the size of the problems. Incentives to get smart – a missed opportunity? Practical solutions exist: Compacting bins – whether solar or mains powered, for waste or recycling, with fill-level sensors or without – were designed with high-density, high traffic sites in mind. The same is true of underground or semi-underground waste systems (UWS/SUWS), which is why all three are becoming more common place...
Committed to protecting natural resources

Committed to protecting natural resources

When manufacturing new plastic containers we pay attention to CO₂ reduction and energy saving. This is also made possible by using secondary raw materials, the composition of which is based on decades of experience and development. Durability is of prime importance: modular construction and material optimisation enhance the quality of our products. Sustainable products are created by optimal design, based on computer simulation and system experience. The interchangeability of individual components and a low-maintenance design give our products a long service life. Production close to the customer with four production facilities in Europe and the implementation of an optimised supply chain strategy ensure savings on fuel for transport and increased...