Cities – Rented Sector Waste Management

Cities – Rented Sector Waste Management

A new ‘Guide to Improving Waste Management in the Domestic Rented Sector’ was released last Friday. CIWM Journal Online says the guide was commissioned “after research suggested that issues including excess waste, difficulty in containing waste, and high levels of recycling contamination from the rented sector contributed to poor street scene and represented a barrier to London reinvigorating recycling.“ With so many ‘actors’ sharing responsibility for household recycling and waste habits and performance (particularly in apartment blocks and HMOs), it’s a hugely complex topic. As Eunomia who developed the report put it, there is “no single ‘silver bullet’ intervention”. Instead they identify two broad areas of intervention – educate and encourage and enact and enforce – offering recommendations which include: incorporating waste management into landlord licensing processes using tenancy agreements to communicate responsibilities to tenants making targeted communications for landlords and tenants on responsibilities and how to use the waste services available These are sound ideas that may well help tackle the unique challenges London and all cities face. That said, there is simply no getting away from the fact that without the provision of adequate, accessible, all-user-friendly containers and waste systems, the issues of excess, containment/’leakage’ and contamination will persist. And as city populations continue to grow, so too will the size of the problems. Incentives to get smart – a missed opportunity? Practical solutions exist: Compacting bins – whether solar or mains powered, for waste or recycling, with fill-level sensors or without – were designed with high-density, high traffic sites in mind. The same is true of underground or semi-underground waste systems (UWS/SUWS), which is why all three are becoming more common place...
Birmingham bound – countdown to #RWM16

Birmingham bound – countdown to #RWM16

This time next week, and until 15th September, you can find us at Hall/Stand: 4K49, our temporary home within #RWM16 at Birmingham’s NEC. The RWM (Resource Waste Management) expo bills itself as “the UK’s premier event for resource efficiency and waste management solutions.” and we’d have to agree. It’s the only event of its kind and, in partnership with CIWM, it covers all aspects of waste hierarchy and every element of our industry. Yup, we don’t mind admitting, we’re excited to be back again this year. As well as catching up with friends, customers and colleagues throughout the waste world, we’re really looking forward to meeting new faces and forging new relationships. So what can you expect to find when you drop by to say hello? Well, taking centre stage will be Clean Cube – our new, innovative and smart waste management solution. This clever compacting bin uses solar energy to power a smart sensor that detects when the bin is reaching capacity, as well as the compaction device it triggers at this point. Once at absolute capacity, the sensor also alerts the operator that its contents are ready for collection. Intelligent and sustainable, the Clean Cube houses a standard wheelie bin and yet it can hold up to eight times more rubbish, considerably reducing overflow and waste collection by up to 85%. And as if substantial cost savings weren’t enough, Clean Cube also has the ability to generate an income stream via its backlit LED advertising panels and provide a WiFi hotspot. We’re looking forward to sharing all these developments, and the latest pedal operated chute, with all interested parties. See you in...
Full Circle Bins

Full Circle Bins

Scotland’s Zero Waste approach highlights the increasing need for managing waste as effectively as possible – but it also brings into focus the increasing pressures on managing resources as efficiently as we can. “When the time comes for a similar approach across the rest of the UK, we need to be sure we can store and move waste without a huge demand on already stretched manufacturing resources, “says ESE World Managing Director Dave Hughes. “Having been involved in the recycling of more than four million plastic wheeled bins, we can now produce containers manufactured from 100% recycled material.” They are robust and durable containers, which meet all the guidelines of the RAL GZ-951/1 quality mark, the most rigorous and demanding standard applied to these products. “The level of recycled content can be specified by customers and is also dependent on colour requirements,” he adds. “The important feature is that we’re able to maximise recycled content through design and process experience, not just through availability of material.” “Just because you have the materials to make a bin doesn’t mean that you can produce a container which will be as good.” “We aim use the resources entrusted to us in a sustainable way. We’re not just aware of our responsibilities towards protecting natural resources, we’ve changed the way we work so that we meet those responsibilities full on.” “When we produce new plastic bins and containers we aim for CO2 reduction through the whole process; from raw materials, through manufacturing, and transport…and back...