Cities – Rented Sector Waste Management

Cities – Rented Sector Waste Management

A new ‘Guide to Improving Waste Management in the Domestic Rented Sector’ was released last Friday. CIWM Journal Online says the guide was commissioned “after research suggested that issues including excess waste, difficulty in containing waste, and high levels of recycling contamination from the rented sector contributed to poor street scene and represented a barrier to London reinvigorating recycling.“ With so many ‘actors’ sharing responsibility for household recycling and waste habits and performance (particularly in apartment blocks and HMOs), it’s a hugely complex topic. As Eunomia who developed the report put it, there is “no single ‘silver bullet’ intervention”. Instead they identify two broad areas of intervention – educate and encourage and enact and enforce – offering recommendations which include: incorporating waste management into landlord licensing processes using tenancy agreements to communicate responsibilities to tenants making targeted communications for landlords and tenants on responsibilities and how to use the waste services available These are sound ideas that may well help tackle the unique challenges London and all cities face. That said, there is simply no getting away from the fact that without the provision of adequate, accessible, all-user-friendly containers and waste systems, the issues of excess, containment/’leakage’ and contamination will persist. And as city populations continue to grow, so too will the size of the problems. Incentives to get smart – a missed opportunity? Practical solutions exist: Compacting bins – whether solar or mains powered, for waste or recycling, with fill-level sensors or without – were designed with high-density, high traffic sites in mind. The same is true of underground or semi-underground waste systems (UWS/SUWS), which is why all three are becoming more common place...
Ugly clutter? There’s no need for it.

Ugly clutter? There’s no need for it.

Communities Secretary Eric Pickles reinforced his commitment to tackle the ‘scourge of bin blight’ by calling on the housing industry to provide more space for waste and recycling containers. (writes ESE World UK Managing Director Dave Hughes) Too many streets are dominated by the ugly clutter of unsightly bins, which ruin the look of families’ homes and gardens, he says. And the NHBC Foundation’s recently published report says that new ways of tackling the scourge of ‘bin blight’ must be found. Doing nothing is not an option. If we do nothing we’ll still be having this debate in 10, 20 and 30 years, by which time we might be climbing over wheelie bins and boxes to get in and out of our homes. But is providing more space the answer? Just by asking developers to allow for a growing range of bins and boxes, are we going to tackle the problem in the long term? No. We need new ways – solutions that are economically viable and sustainable, and, importantly, that are tried and tested. Let’s look at the first, perhaps most obvious solution. A bigger bin, slightly larger than the norm, which includes four compartments. Each household has at least one but no more than two. That’s a total of eight compartments per household for organic waste, paper, cardboard, plastics, coloured glass, clear glass, metals and residual waste. But if you need to you can hang another small box on the side; in fact on both sides of both bins. That’s now 12 compartments or small boxes in all, which would seem to go a long way to...
Glasgow’s landmark park sends litter underground

Glasgow’s landmark park sends litter underground

Kelvingrove Park is 85 acres of parkland located in the West End of Glasgow. It’s both picturesque and very busy. Its central location makes it a popular route for commuters to the city centre and popular with dog walkers, as well as students from the nearby University of Glasgow. Traditional post or standing bins struggle to cope with the volume of rubbish where there are large number of people. Stand-alone semi-underground collection points provide an effective alternative and flexibility around where the systems can be sited make them ideal where there’s limited space or restricted access. Semi underground collection points have their greater portion placed underground, with only the inlets above the surface, so they’re also an ideal anywhere there are lots of people generating waste on the move. They also offer opportunities to segregate recyclable materials at the point at which they’re thrown away and more waste can be stored, and then moved with less frequent use of vehicles. Additional advantages include fewer odours, the confinement of bacteria, increased compaction, improved street, neighbourhood and park aesthetics, limited maintenance requirements and more protection against vandalism. Glasgow City Council has installed two semi-underground waste systems manufactured by ESE, in Kelvingrove Park. They’re sited at a large open sunny slope that attracts a huge amount of users. They’re the first two to be installed in the city’s parks and it was their effectiveness in Edinburgh’s Princes Street Gardens that prompted Gavin Jackson, Assistant Parks Operations Manager (North) to consider underground storage. “I visited Princes Street Gardens to see their effectiveness and ease of emptying. I was told that the reduction in working hours...
Big stadiums and big spaces need big remedies

Big stadiums and big spaces need big remedies

It’s strange but sometimes true. The bigger the event or the more popular a location, the more people… but the smaller the litter bins. Invariably, a scattering of traditional collection bins isn’t enough to cope with busy periods and some of the rubbish being swept up and cleared away spent only a few seconds in a bin before overflow and a breeze sent it on its way. So, it would seem safe to assume that inadequate containers overflowing with rubbish are not a sight to behold. But at sports stadia, popular parks and sea fronts we seem to be stuck in ‘a small bin rut’, according to Dave Hughes, managing director of ESE World. “It’s surprising, given that the development of efficient solutions and practices for effective management of urban waste is one of the most pressing problems communities face today. “ There are a number of drivers for better solutions: the rise in waste volumes; increased hygienic and amenity demands; overflow of waste; and the environmental impact caused by so many vehicles travelling to and from depots and recycling sites. “Traditional management schemes are either unable to meet the demands or the remedies simply lead to increased operating costs,” says Dave. “It’s not just a problem faced by councils either, but one which private contractors must deal with as well.” The introduction of semi underground infrastructure for waste collection provides an efficient and cost-effective option. Some European countries have been doing it this way for 20 years or so and in these countries, such as the Netherlands and Finland, stand-alone semi-underground collection points are common. Flexibility about where...