Which came first – the waste or the (smart) bin?

Which came first – the waste or the (smart) bin?

ESE World UK Managing Director Dave Hughes writes: We’ve recently added a new product to our portfolio. We’ve dubbed it a smart bin, because it is – in so many ways: – It’s barely bigger than a regular wheelie bin, yet it takes up to 8 times the amount of litter. – It contains a regular wheelie bin, so it doesn’t require any special kit when it’s time to empty it. – It is fully enclosed in a smart steel box, so will never go walkabouts. – It knows when it needs emptying and will tell whoever is responsible for that itself. – It is powered by the sun. – It can provide a wifi hotspot. – It can make its owner money! We are well aware that it isn’t the first solar-powered compacting bin to appear on the market, but that’s part of its appeal. Working with eCube Labs, we’ve been able to improve on what was already available and have created the perfect solution for high-footfall areas where large volumes of rubbish need to be managed. Now naturally, we are biassed. We think the Clean Cube could transform not just built environments, but also waste management and, with it, organisations’ operating costs. We are genuinely proud of what we’ve created and excited by the impact we see it having. So I can’t deny that a comment I heard about smart bins recently, threw me for a moment. The conversation was relating to the state of public parks at the end of a sunny day. You can picture the scene; overflowing, open bins with picnic rubbish including food waste...
Ugly clutter? There’s no need for it.

Ugly clutter? There’s no need for it.

Communities Secretary Eric Pickles reinforced his commitment to tackle the ‘scourge of bin blight’ by calling on the housing industry to provide more space for waste and recycling containers. (writes ESE World UK Managing Director Dave Hughes) Too many streets are dominated by the ugly clutter of unsightly bins, which ruin the look of families’ homes and gardens, he says. And the NHBC Foundation’s recently published report says that new ways of tackling the scourge of ‘bin blight’ must be found. Doing nothing is not an option. If we do nothing we’ll still be having this debate in 10, 20 and 30 years, by which time we might be climbing over wheelie bins and boxes to get in and out of our homes. But is providing more space the answer? Just by asking developers to allow for a growing range of bins and boxes, are we going to tackle the problem in the long term? No. We need new ways – solutions that are economically viable and sustainable, and, importantly, that are tried and tested. Let’s look at the first, perhaps most obvious solution. A bigger bin, slightly larger than the norm, which includes four compartments. Each household has at least one but no more than two. That’s a total of eight compartments per household for organic waste, paper, cardboard, plastics, coloured glass, clear glass, metals and residual waste. But if you need to you can hang another small box on the side; in fact on both sides of both bins. That’s now 12 compartments or small boxes in all, which would seem to go a long way to...
ESE World MD Dave Hughes on longevity and myths 

ESE World MD Dave Hughes on longevity and myths 

I’m a convert. They say converts can become somewhat evangelical about their cause. Well, we’ve produced plastic containers that are in use all over the UK and Europe. Some have been in service – without repair or modification – for 17 years. That’s a good reason to take sides especially when I read some claims made on websites in the UK. For example: “The durability of our metal waste and recycling containers ensures they’ll stand the test of time. All in all, they offer demonstrably superior whole life value against alternative metal bins and, unlike plastic equivalents they won’t need frequent replacement because of fire loss or irreparable damage (typically 30% better over a 10 year comparison).” “Our waste and recycling containers are the most durable… and, unlike their plastic equivalents, you won’t suffer the cost and inconvenience of loss to fire or irreparable damage.” I’ve not set out to rubbish metal containers or metal container manufacturers; far from it. They produce good quality products. My aim is to dispel a myth because there’s room and reason for both in the marketplace, and it’s just not the case that metal containers are superior to plastic. I have worked in the waste industry for more than 30 years and operated both municipal contracts collecting trade refuse and C&I collection depots. I used to specify metal containers rather than plastic. Why? Because there was a perception they lasted longer because the fronts didn’t bow or crack, the lifting lugs didn’t break off and, if the bin was fire damaged, a plastic container would just be a molten blob on the ground....
Industry opinion for Recycling & Waste World

Industry opinion for Recycling & Waste World

Dave Hughes, MD at ESE World, provided industry opinion for May’s edition of Recycling and Waste World Magazine. The article looks forward to the future for the Waste industry, drawing comparisons to the industry progression over the past 25 years and explaining recent developments which are benefiting waste management processes. The full article is available as Our Anniversary Challenge on this website – click here to view...
Big stadiums and big spaces need big remedies

Big stadiums and big spaces need big remedies

It’s strange but sometimes true. The bigger the event or the more popular a location, the more people… but the smaller the litter bins. Invariably, a scattering of traditional collection bins isn’t enough to cope with busy periods and some of the rubbish being swept up and cleared away spent only a few seconds in a bin before overflow and a breeze sent it on its way. So, it would seem safe to assume that inadequate containers overflowing with rubbish are not a sight to behold. But at sports stadia, popular parks and sea fronts we seem to be stuck in ‘a small bin rut’, according to Dave Hughes, managing director of ESE World. “It’s surprising, given that the development of efficient solutions and practices for effective management of urban waste is one of the most pressing problems communities face today. “ There are a number of drivers for better solutions: the rise in waste volumes; increased hygienic and amenity demands; overflow of waste; and the environmental impact caused by so many vehicles travelling to and from depots and recycling sites. “Traditional management schemes are either unable to meet the demands or the remedies simply lead to increased operating costs,” says Dave. “It’s not just a problem faced by councils either, but one which private contractors must deal with as well.” The introduction of semi underground infrastructure for waste collection provides an efficient and cost-effective option. Some European countries have been doing it this way for 20 years or so and in these countries, such as the Netherlands and Finland, stand-alone semi-underground collection points are common. Flexibility about where...
In defence of plastic – ESE World Managing Director Dave Hughes on longevity and busting myths 

In defence of plastic – ESE World Managing Director Dave Hughes on longevity and busting myths 

I’m a convert. They say converts can become somewhat evangelical about their cause. Well, we’ve produced plastic containers that are in use all over the UK and Europe. Some have been in service – without repair or modification – for 17 years. That’s a good reason to take sides especially when I read some claims made on websites in the UK. For example: “The durability of our metal waste and recycling containers ensures they’ll stand the test of time. All in all, they offer demonstrably superior whole life value against alternative metal bins and, unlike plastic equivalents they won’t need frequent replacement because of fire loss or irreparable damage (typically 30% better over a 10 year comparison).”  “Our waste and recycling containers are the most durable… and, unlike their plastic equivalents, you won’t suffer the cost and inconvenience of loss to fire or irreparable damage.” I’ve not set out to rubbish metal containers or metal container manufacturers; far from it. They produce good quality products. My aim is to dispel a myth because there’s room and reason for both in the marketplace, and it’s just not the case that metal containers are superior to plastic. I have worked in the waste industry for more than 30 years and operated both municipal contracts collecting trade refuse and C&I collection depots. I used to specify metal containers rather than plastic. Why? Because there was a perception they lasted longer because the fronts didn’t bow or crack, the lifting lugs didn’t break off and, if the bin was fire damaged, a plastic container would just be a molten blob on the ground....