Sustainability

Sustainability

ESE World takes full responsibility towards the environment and is committed to protect natural resources. When manufacturing new plastic containers we pay attention to CO₂ reduction and energy saving. This is also made possible by using secondary raw materials, the composition of which is based on decades of experience and development. Durability is of prime importance: modular construction and material optimisation enhance the quality of our products. Sustainable products are created by optimal design, based on computer simulation and system experience. The interchangeability of individual components and a low-maintenance design give our products a long service life. Production close to the customer with four production facilities in Europe and the implementation of an optimised supply chain strategy ensure savings on fuel for transport and increased...
Full Circle Bins

Full Circle Bins

Scotland’s Zero Waste approach highlights the increasing need for managing waste as effectively as possible – but it also brings into focus the increasing pressures on managing resources as efficiently as we can. “When the time comes for a similar approach across the rest of the UK, we need to be sure we can store and move waste without a huge demand on already stretched manufacturing resources, “says ESE World Managing Director Dave Hughes. “Having been involved in the recycling of more than four million plastic wheeled bins, we can now produce containers manufactured from 100% recycled material.” They are robust and durable containers, which meet all the guidelines of the RAL GZ-951/1 quality mark, the most rigorous and demanding standard applied to these products. “The level of recycled content can be specified by customers and is also dependent on colour requirements,” he adds. “The important feature is that we’re able to maximise recycled content through design and process experience, not just through availability of material.” “Just because you have the materials to make a bin doesn’t mean that you can produce a container which will be as good.” “We aim use the resources entrusted to us in a sustainable way. We’re not just aware of our responsibilities towards protecting natural resources, we’ve changed the way we work so that we meet those responsibilities full on.” “When we produce new plastic bins and containers we aim for CO2 reduction through the whole process; from raw materials, through manufacturing, and transport…and back...
Big stadiums and big spaces need big remedies

Big stadiums and big spaces need big remedies

It’s strange but sometimes true. The bigger the event or the more popular a location, the more people… but the smaller the litter bins. Invariably, a scattering of traditional collection bins isn’t enough to cope with busy periods and some of the rubbish being swept up and cleared away spent only a few seconds in a bin before overflow and a breeze sent it on its way. So, it would seem safe to assume that inadequate containers overflowing with rubbish are not a sight to behold. But at sports stadia, popular parks and sea fronts we seem to be stuck in ‘a small bin rut’, according to Dave Hughes, managing director of ESE World. “It’s surprising, given that the development of efficient solutions and practices for effective management of urban waste is one of the most pressing problems communities face today. “ There are a number of drivers for better solutions: the rise in waste volumes; increased hygienic and amenity demands; overflow of waste; and the environmental impact caused by so many vehicles travelling to and from depots and recycling sites. “Traditional management schemes are either unable to meet the demands or the remedies simply lead to increased operating costs,” says Dave. “It’s not just a problem faced by councils either, but one which private contractors must deal with as well.” The introduction of semi underground infrastructure for waste collection provides an efficient and cost-effective option. Some European countries have been doing it this way for 20 years or so and in these countries, such as the Netherlands and Finland, stand-alone semi-underground collection points are common. Flexibility about where...
In defence of plastic – ESE World Managing Director Dave Hughes on longevity and busting myths 

In defence of plastic – ESE World Managing Director Dave Hughes on longevity and busting myths 

I’m a convert. They say converts can become somewhat evangelical about their cause. Well, we’ve produced plastic containers that are in use all over the UK and Europe. Some have been in service – without repair or modification – for 17 years. That’s a good reason to take sides especially when I read some claims made on websites in the UK. For example: “The durability of our metal waste and recycling containers ensures they’ll stand the test of time. All in all, they offer demonstrably superior whole life value against alternative metal bins and, unlike plastic equivalents they won’t need frequent replacement because of fire loss or irreparable damage (typically 30% better over a 10 year comparison).”  “Our waste and recycling containers are the most durable… and, unlike their plastic equivalents, you won’t suffer the cost and inconvenience of loss to fire or irreparable damage.” I’ve not set out to rubbish metal containers or metal container manufacturers; far from it. They produce good quality products. My aim is to dispel a myth because there’s room and reason for both in the marketplace, and it’s just not the case that metal containers are superior to plastic. I have worked in the waste industry for more than 30 years and operated both municipal contracts collecting trade refuse and C&I collection depots. I used to specify metal containers rather than plastic. Why? Because there was a perception they lasted longer because the fronts didn’t bow or crack, the lifting lugs didn’t break off and, if the bin was fire damaged, a plastic container would just be a molten blob on the ground....
Our anniversary challenge

Our anniversary challenge

Milestones and anniversaries can be strange affairs. This year we mark 25 years in the UK marketplace. Should we look back on our achievements or look forward to things not yet done? It’s easy, as we often hear, to dwell in the past. It’s easier to be smug about the things you’ve already done. But we’re all for looking forward – and the whole industry needs to be. The greatest challenges are yet to come, as we tackle the huge demand for waste management systems that don’t impact on the environment and which communities can accept because they’re effective, yet discreet. Our first 25 years in the UK have seen many changes. Contractors and council waste collection teams no longer collect waste but make collections of commodities and resources.  Greater environmental awareness and an understanding that we cannot continue to discard valuable resources, means we must manage them in smarter, more efficient ways. We use two-wheeled bins (dubbed the wheelie bin) instead of dustbins. They said it would never catch on. The litter bin market has changed from the traditional (boring) steel post-mounted can to contemporary designed street furniture. The industrial and commercial waste market has changed from plastic to metal containers and is swinging back again as recycling and manufacturing techniques improve. We’ve been involved in the recycling of more than four million plastic wheeled bins and we can now produce containers manufactured from 100% recycled material. In scribbling down a few challenges for the next 25 years, we’re mindful of the need to store and move waste without a huge demand on already stretched manufacturing resources. People are talking in...